Tag Archives: Maine

20 Hours in Portland, Maine

What better way to wrap up a week down the Cape than a weekend in Vacationland?  Or technically, 20 hours in Portland, Maine.  We were only there long enough to catch a ferry, enjoy a wedding on an island, eat a pizza, take a nap, drink a cup of coffee, buy a lighthouse postcard for a lady in Poland, and retrieve our car… but hey.  

I’m always game for a change of scenery, however short, especially if water and boats and beaches are involved.

20 hours in portland maine

20 HOURS IN PORTLAND, MAINE

Saturday, 1 PM: Check-in at The Hilton Garden Inn Downtown Waterfront

After 3-ish hours on the road from Boston (we hit a little traffic, which seems appropriate for a summer Saturday) we arrived at our hotel, The Hilton Garden Inn Downtown Waterfront.  My not-so-extensive research involved Googling the ferry line we’d be taking to the wedding, locating the closest hotel, comparing prices a bit (there are a few hotels within walking distance of the Casco Bay Ferry Lines), and checking availability.

We were really happy with the Hilton.  So, um… thanks, Google.  The night before we arrived, I was able to check-in using the Hilton Honors app and choose our room (something I’ve never seen before, making joining HH and downloading the app totally worth the 2 seconds each required).  I snagged the last room available with a water view, which felt like a triumph of sorts.  

We arrived well before check-in… but shortly before we needed to arrive at a wedding in all our “beach formal” glory, so we left our bags with the front desk staff and freshened up in the pool/fitness center area before making our way across the street to buy our ferry tickets.

20 hours in portland maine

Even the drain markers are cute.  Or whatever.

1:30 PM: Purchase ferry tickets

casco bay ferry maine

Super easy.  Round-trip tickets to the Casco Bay islands are $11.  They need to be purchased in person, however… so don’t do what I did.  (Which is spend an hour trying to figure out how to buy them online.  And another six minutes calling the terminal to ask how to buy them online.)

1:35 PM: Quick lunch at the Dry Dock

20 hours in portland maine

And by lunch, I mean… I ate onion rings and drank a Diet Coke at the bar.  That’s how I wile out on vacation.  Nick, on the other hand, had a lobster roll and an Angry Orchard. He’s my better half, and also, my more normal half.  It was relatively quiet at the bar, but there’s a bigger seating area out back, including a deck with views of the bay.  I think that’s where everyone else was.  Eating onion rings.  Or maybe an entire meal of food.  

2:00 PM: Board the ferry to Long Island

There’s a Long Island in Maine.  And that’s where we went.  I didn’t take many (any?) pictures on the ferry, but the 30 minute ride was comfortable and the views were extraordinary.  We passed several lighthouses, gorgeous sailboats and schooners, and a few smaller islands before reaching the dock and heading to the wedding.

long island maine

8:50 PM: Return ferry to Portland

long island maine sunset

The ride back to Portland took closer to an hour (the route is a loop, and so we hit more stops on the way back), but we got to enjoy the most spectacular sunset while waiting on the pier.  Once we got back to Portland, I grabbed our bags and headed up to our hotel room… while Nick picked up a veggie pizza from Bill’s Pizza on Commercial Street.  

Sunday, 8:00 AM: Breakfast at the Standard Baking Company

standard baking company portland maine

The next morning, we ventured out for a walk, but the skies opened up (and who packs an umbrella?) after a few blocks, so we headed back toward the hotel and grabbed coffee, tea and 9,000 calories worth of baked goods from the Standard Baking Company.  I highly recommend the gingerbread with lemon glaze.  And I want to go back and eat everything else they have to offer.  In the meantime, I’ve got my eye on their cookbook.

20 hours in portland maine

We stopped into a nearby shop for the aforementioned postcard (a postcrossing special request) and matching lobster pajamas for the babes before checking out and heading back to Boston.

It was a short, but sweet (extra sweet if you consider that gingerbread) visit to the Portland area.  I’m looking forward to heading back when we have a bit more time to explore and enjoy the area.

Also On Tap for Today:

Where’s your favorite Long Island quick getaway destination?

 

 

Today: My favorite vacation photos.

We’ve snuck out of town for some warmer weather.  And yes, I know you’re not supposed to tell people you’re away, but let’s be serious:

  1. What happens on vacation ends up on Instagram and I can’t resist sharing a good sunset shot.
  2. All the important and valuable things are coming with me (Because, hello… the important and valuable things aren’t things.  They’re people).  So, I guess I’m not really worried.

If you’re spending this Monday getting sucked into a Polar Vortex (Do we capitalize that? It nearly froze my eyelashes off last year, so I am guessing something that powerful and terrifying deserves capitalization.), the least I can do is give you a little mental vacation.

A few of my favorite vacation photos

My favorite vacation photos - from the Berkshires to the British Virgin Islands

Here are a few of my favorite vacation photos (and memories) I’ve collected over the years.

North Adams, MA

A couple years ago, we spent a long weekend at Porches, visited Mass MoCA (and an old burial ground, because I am a creep) and climbed little mountains with our little dog.

My favorite vacation photos - Clark climbs a mountain in North Adams, MA

My favorite vacation photos - burial ground in North Adams, Massachusetts

My favorite vacation photos - Mass MoCA in North Adams, Massachusetts

My favorite vacation photos - North Adams, Massachusetts

U.S. and British Virgin Islands

And now I want to go on our Honeymoon again.  Like, real bad.  We stayed on St. John, but took a few sailing and day trips to places like Virgin Gorda.  We snorkeled in caves, spied on sea turtles and drank Old English ciders (because gluten allergies do not take vacations no matter how badly one craves a cold beer).  I took 9,000 photos.  And did lots of floating.

My favorite vacation photos - snorkeling in caves British Virgin Islands

My favorite vacation photos - Virgin Gorda

My favorite vacation photos - Virgin Gorda British Virigin Islands

My favorite vacation photos - St. John, Sugar Mill at Caneel Bay

My favorite vacation photos - Honeymoon at Caneel Bay, St. John USVI

Boothbay Harbor, Maine

This is why Maine is called Vacationland.

My favorite vacation photos - Boothbay Harbor, Maine

My favorite vacation photos - Boothbay Harbor, Maine

My favorite vacation photos - Boothbay Harbor, Maine

Aaaaand… a bonus photo of Clark.

My favorite vacation photos - Clark the French Bulldog knows how to do vacations

The dude knows how to do vacations.

Also On Tap for Today:

  • Working on some festive posts and giveaways (which I shall draft on the back of a cocktail napkin — attempting to unplug whilst on vacation!)
  • Doesn’t this look lovely (albeit not Polar Vortex friendly)? An outdoor Thanksgiving via The Kitchn
  • So helpful for space cadets like myself: Real Simple’s vacation packing checklist

Where is your favorite (or top-of-the-bucket-list) vacation destination?

Today: The Weekend According to Instagram XXVIII

We made a quick trip to Maine this weekend to see Nick’s parents, and made it back to the city in time for our niece’s birthday party.  By the time Sunday evening rolled around, I was ready to face plant into bed… but forced myself to do laundry first.  You know, so I would have something to wear come Monday morning.

Oh, and before we dig into my own Instagram feed, I came across something worth sharing this morning: Brendon and Danielle are hosting a fantastic yoga challenge (starting today) that focuses on modifications.  I love that there is room for everyone to practice in yoga, and this challenge reflects that.

Okay.  Let’s look at pictures of my trunk.  And the harbor.  And my dog.

The Weekend According to Instagram XXVIII

Follow me on Instagram: @ElizabethEv

  1. This is what “packing light” looks like these days.  After visiting my parents on the Cape over the 4th, we had a pretty good sense of what was necessary and what we could leave home.  I am not sure why I packed 100 diapers for a 36 hour trip, but hey. In addition to the obvious (ye olde Pack ‘N Play), we have a couple baby items that have been great for travel: this Skip Hop outdoor blanket which folds up beautifully and easily wipes clean (bonus points for for detachable insulated bag – we used this for Grace’s rash guard and swim diaper last weekend) and the Puj Flyte infant bath, which also folds up (sensing a theme?) and fits in most sinks.  I was afraid Grace had outgrown the Flyte (we used it for her first few baths at home), but it actually works even better now that she’s, welp… sturdier.
  2. I will never tire of this view. Dusk in Boothbay Harbor is just incredible.  I remember one of my art history professors in college talking about how the light in Maine is magic.  I thought he was high.  Now I think he was just telling the truth (also, he could have been high).
  3. Other magical things in Maine: This aptly named “Little House” nestled just along the harbor.  When I’m old I want to live in a little house (specifically: a tiny house).
  4. I’ve been sharing pages from my sketchbook lately on Instagram.  I’ve always loved to draw, but I’m finding it especially productive as a way to quiet my brain a bit at the end of the day.  I’m the first to admit that I’m tightly wound and the last few months?  On another level.  I’ve been breaking out some paper, a pen and a set of watercolors most nights after Grace goes to sleep (and, inevitably, before she wakes up again).  There were a few Audubon field guides at the cottage (plus, like… real birds outside…), hence the, um... birdoodles.
  5. An old, old wooden ship.
  6. Clark loves heading North.  He also loves pretending to play guard dog behind decorative screen doors.
  7. How I close out the weekend: brewing a pitcher of peppermint tea to sip cold throughout the week.  Super refreshing.  The Yogi Tea quotes help.
  8. New animal obsession: hedgehogs.  I picked up this set of notecards at Target (no surprise there).  More hedgehog cuteness: Biddy the Hedgehog’s Instagram account.  He fits in the palm of your hand, he visits National Parks, he is magnificent.
  9. Aaaaaaand a tiny OOTD: Grace’s party dress for her cousin’s birthday.  Wouldn’t be a party without a bow.

Hope you had a lovely weekend, too.

Also On Tap for Today:

What was the highlight of your weekend?

Today: The weekend according to Instagram XV.

After a week off, enjoying the quiet of Maine, celebrating America’s birthday, and wearing non-work clothing (mostly bathing suits), it’s back to liiiiife, back to reality.  Let’s relive the glory that is the weekend.

The weekend according to Instagram XV

For more snapshots, follow me @ElizabethEv

  1. After several days of rain (which I spent wrapped up in a quilt on the porch swing) I was so happy to be able to get my float on in that icy Maine water before heading back to Boston.  Pure bliss.
  2. While I was pretending to be a mermaid, Clark wound down his final minutes of vacation like the fancy dog he is: legs crossed, sunning on the deck.  The second we got home, he went straight into the tub.  That little guy really made the most of his time in the woods, pawing through mud, eating various insects, and splashing in streams.  In other words: he smelled like a dead squirrel.
  3. The mysteries of life: Why does it take me six days to unpack from a five day trip?  That American flag scarf, by the way, is from Hazel & Olive.  I ordered it just before Memorial Day, when all proceeds benefited the Wounded Warrior Project. #winwin
  4. I like Clark’s July face.  I should probably start compiling photos for The Clark Chronicles 2014…  Can’t get enough of the little muffin?  He’s on Facebook aaaand now Instagram.
  5. A little weekend reading courtesy of WodTalk magazine – lots of great information for fellow CrossFitters.
  6. Nick mentioned something about an NFL fantasy draft, and I immediately felt the urge to bake.  When football is on (which it isn’t, and won’t be for a while thank goodness), I can likely be found making a mess in the kitchen.  I answered the urge with a batch of gluten free blueberry and cinnamon muffins.  I loosely followed a basic blueberry muffin recipe, substituting almond meal for flour and coconut milk for regular ol’ milk and overdoing it a bit on the cinnamon.  Also, I think I ate an entire pint of blueberries while waiting for the over to pre-heat.
  7. Speaking of berries, all I want to eat during the summer is fruit.  The hot pink-er, the better.  I love raspberries.
  8. New hulu+ obsession: A Day in the Life, a series of half hour documentaries from Morgan Spurlock (of Supersize Me fame).  We watched episodes following ?uestlove (his new book is next on my summer reading list) and Braddock, PA mayor John Fetterman.  Both were fascinating.  I highly recommend checking out the series.  I find that since we ditched cable, not only do we watch less television (via our cute little Roku, which streams hulu, Netflix, Amazon Prime, etc.), but we watch better, more interesting television.
  9. Started the weekend floating; ended the weekend floating.  Nick and I enjoyed a little pool time with my parents, and my newlywed sister and brother-in-law (happy almost two month anniversary) on Sunday.  Noodles rule.  Poodles drool.

Also On Tap for Today:

What was the highlight of your weekend?

Today: Greetings from Boothbay Harbor.

We’re spending a few days in Boothbay Harbor, enjoying the relaxed pace of Maine life and cool ocean air.  Nick has vowed to eat lobster at every meal, while Clark and I are spending as much time as possible curled up on the porch swing now that the rain has cleared.

We love it up here; I am sure it’s easy to see why.

Also On Tap for Today:

How are you spending the 4th?

Today: Back floats and naps, box jumps and lunges.

[tweetmeme source=”elizabethev” only_single=false]After a quick back float in Boothbay Harbor, I’m back and better than ever probably just my same old self.

Salt water is good for your soul.  So are naps, especially when you have a Frenchie to serve as your alarm clock.

We were only Downeast for 48 hours before returning to the city, but we made sure to get our fill of swimming, lounging, and snacking.

Nick and I had to get back to Boston for our day-long Pre-Cana (marriage prep for Catholics, required if you’re getting married in the church) on Saturday.  And, um, we were also anxious to catch as most of the Crossfit Games as possible.  God before wods, though… obviously.

I am in awe of how strong, fit and focused all of the competing athletes are.  Watching various parts of the Games served as great motivation.  We hit up Crossfit Southie together on Sunday morning and, though I am still scaling my workouts on the easier side, I completely crushed it, finishing in 6:17.  Apparently I have a strong affinity for box jumps and lunges.

[Image source]

They’re almost as much fun as back floats and naps.  Almost.

Also On Tap for Today:

What was the highlight of your weekend?

Today: What to pack for three days in Maine.

[tweetmeme source=”elizabethev” only_single=false]It’s very simple, really.

Three bathing suits.  Two novels (one should have a lobster on the dust jacket).  One pair of peace moccasins.

Also On Tap for Today:

What are your summer getaway essentials?

Today: Not now, Atlantic puffin.

[tweetmeme source=”elizabethev” only_single=false]Earlier this year I went on a puffin expedition with every intention of spotting that little clay guy from Elf.  Needless to say, that didn’t happen.  Also needless to say, I need to brush up on wildlife.  While in Maine, Nick and I joined his parents aboard The Pink Lady at Pier 7.  We had cameras, binos (short for binoculars… learned that one from Whale Wars, obvi), sunscreen and snacks.  And a plan to see some puffins.

Not now, arctic puffin!

[Photo source]

Buddy the Elf had Arctic puffins, but it turns out the ones in Boothbay Harbor are Atlantic puffins.  Because, um, one lives in the Arctic and the other in the Atlantic.  Once I realized I knew nothing about (really anything) puffins, it was a lot easier to learn from the naturalist on board The Pink Lady.  It turns out that Eastern Egg Rock, located about 10 miles off the Maine coast, is the first restored puffin colony in the world.  The puffin community there was depleted in the late 1800’s by hunters collecting eggs and feathers (for sassy old lady fashions).  Young puffins were brought from New Foundland to Egg Rock by the Audubon Society.  Naturalists hoped that they could imprint the location in the pufflings memory so that the birds would later return to Egg Rock to breed.

Yes!  Baby puffins are called pufflings!

It took several years, but eventually the puffins returned to Eastern Egg Rock and started having pufflings of their own.  And the rest, as they say, is history.  As we cruised out of the harbor, I wondered if we’d actually see any of these little cuties.  Boothbay itself is full of puffin imagery, but the way the naturalist was talking, real, live sightings weren’t guaranteed.

We must have good puffin karma, however, because as we approached the Egg, the captain spotted a puffin flying across the bow.  And soon there was another.  And another.  And an entire raft of puffins on the port side!  (While I looked for an actual raft, covered with puffins, everyone else took photos of a group of puffins, floating on the ocean’s surface.)   In addition to two new vocab words (puffling and raft), I learned that puffins are quite small.  And that a zoom lens would have helped quite a bit.

Live and learn.  And take a puffin tour.

Also On Tap for Today:

Learned anything new lately?

Today: The books I wish I had written.

[tweetmeme source=”elizabethev” only_single=false]After returning from Boothbay Harbor, one of the first things I did was rave to my mother about J. Courtney Sullivan‘s second novel, Maine.  Already a New York Times best seller,  “It’s the kind of book you read and think… I wish I wrote this book,” I told my mom.  It was evocative, and equally as heartbreaking as uplifting– I only wished it was waterproof, so I could take it out on the float with me.

I started thinking about other books I wish I had written.  Unfortunately people like Charles Dickens are always beating me to the punch.  Pests.  Since I just gave away the first author (I was distracted, trying to invent some reason to type What the Dickens?!), I suppose that’s a reasonable place to start.

A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens, clearly, I am not.  The last piece of fiction I wrote was my resume.  Totally kidding.  It was an adaptation of Robin Hood, inspired by an illuminated manuscript from the medieval period.  And if you have not already died of boredom, I will elaborate.  It was written in French and (shock!) entirely awful.  And it is now either taking up space in a landfill (sorry, Al Gore) or hanging in my professor’s office, a testament to all that is wrong with American co-eds.

A Tale of Two Cities showed me that a book could be so much more than a book, even if it was assigned reading.  A carefully drawn plot could become a treasure map of sorts.  When Mme. Defarge started knitting in deathly code, I was hooked.

Charlotte’s Web

Each year, a certain teacher at our grammar school would be reduce to tears, all because of an itsy, bitsy spider.  She would barely finish reading the first chapter aloud before dissolving into a crying fit, but– because she loved Charlotte’s Web so– she would pick it up again, day after day, until finally her students would know the ending.  In second grade, I was in the classroom next door.  We listened to a lot of music that year, likely to drown out all the sobbing.

Someone gave me a hard cover copy of the book (I remember it being a First Communion present… that can’t be right, can it?), and I read it on my own that summer.  It was the first book to break my heart.  Had I actually understood The Velveteen Rabbit at such a tender age, surely it would have taken the prize.  That story is brutal.  Regardless, Charlotte’s Web taught me about sacrifice and love and friendship in terms I could understand.  Plus, it made me wonder about farms.

There Are No Children Here

I discovered Alex Kotlowitz after re-reading four of Jonathan Kozol’s books in as many days.  It was the summer after I graduated from Boston College.  I was awaiting acceptance into several volunteer programs, and feeling rather adrift in the world.  If Charlotte’s Web broke my eight-year-old heart, There Are No Children Here ripped my twenty-two-year-old heart to shreds.  I coveted Kotlowitz’s ability to engage, with a seemingly endless reservoir of compassion, while still respecting the professional tenets of journalism.  I couldn’t imagine how I was laughing at the little anecdotes he shared, given the devastation surrounding these stories.  And no sooner had I finished laughing, I was crying like that second grade teacher.  It was all just so human.

A few month later, I would go on to start a career in youth development.  I don’t think this is a coincidence.

I Was Told There’d Be Cake

If I was funny enough, rich enough, and patient enough to be a comedian, I would want to be Sloane Crosley.  And if I couldn’t be her, I’d at least want to steal all of her material.  I thought people who laughed out loud while reading on planes were manner-less goobers, until I became one of those people (we all know my manners are impeccable).  Crosley’s essays are all at once poignant and hilarious.

Packed and ready to make peace.

I’ve started writing a few books in my head, including one called Frenchie Kisses for Everyone (a working title, mind you).  The story follows me and Clark, as we circumnavigate the globe and (as the title indicates), he kisses everyone we meet.  In the face of such overwhelming cuteness, rebel forces lay down their arms, corporate standoffs grind to a halt, and you know… other stuff.

Maybe I could start by writing one of those “choose your own adventure” books.  That way, I wouldn’t really have to commit to an ending, and my overactive imagination could be of benefit.  For once.

Also On Tap for Today:

Which book(s) do you wish you had written?

Today: Must do in Boothbay Harbor and {a giveaway}.

[tweetmeme source=”elizabethev” only_single=false]Remember that 90’s jam, “Back to life, back to reality?”  I feel like the singer with the serious shoulder pads has been whispering the lyrics into my ear all week long.  I’m back in the city, and back to the grind, but certainly feeling more relaxed and rested (and freckled) after our Maine vacation.  Boothbay Harbor is only half a tank of gas from Boston, but feels like it could be on another planet.  Mostly because my office and laundry pile aren’t there.

Mini ship in a mini bottle.

If you’re looking for a quick getaway from your own pile of laundry, I highly recommend a trip to the Boothbay area.  The drive from Boston takes about 3.5 hours (though I make it under 3 once last year…), and is really scenic.  Towards the end of the trip, you pass through adorable towns like Wiscasset, where everything is cute and old and you sort of want to take pictures of random people walking their dogs.  Or maybe you didn’t get enough sleep because the night before you go on vacation feels like Christmas Eve.

Regardless, a few tips if you’re thinking about heading north.  Or south.  Or however you get there from where you are.

Where to stay

My fish eye lens is one of my favorite little gadgets-- it was super inexpensive and really fun to use.

Last year, Nick’s mother found the most adorable cottage, located right on Linekin Bay, on Home Away.  The house was built in the 1920’s and is the perfect place to spend a week on the water.  I was so excited when she rented the same house again this year.  If I wasn’t floating in the bay, I was curled up on the glider on the porch with a book.  Nick and his brother fished from the dock, while we chatted with the family staying next door.  It really feels like a home away from home.  If you’d prefer to stay in a hotel or inn, there are a number of great options right downtown, as well as the Linekin Bay Resort, located right on the water with numerous amenities.

What and where to eat

Time to get crackin'. (And yes, that is a vacation beard.)

If you’re into seafood (specifically, lobsters), Boothbay Harbor is where it’s at.  If you’re a vegetarian, and you like when your boyfriend is happy (after consuming 9 lobsters over the course of a single week), Boothbay Harbor is most definitely where it’s at.  There are several places downtown that sell lobsters wholesale (~$6/lb.) for cooking and eating at home.  We had two lobster dinners at the cottage, out on the deck overlooking the water.  I wore yoga pants.  And no shoes.  Those were probably my favorite meals of the week.  While everyone else went to town on their lobsters and clams, I enjoyed corn on the cob, salad, tomatoes, potatoes, pasta and ice cream sundaes the size of my Ford Focus.

We also enjoyed some great meals in town.  I would recommend a visit to any of these restaurants and cafes.

I bet this guy catches some pretty big fish.

Breakfast

  • Mama D’s: Lots to look at, including a fairy village built inside one of the bay windows.  Breakfast was consistently good there.
  • Ebb Tide: Skip the bowl of berries (too sweet, possibly frozen) and go straight for the cinnamon roll.  Trust me on this.

Lunch

  • Lobster Dock: Grab a picnic table right next to the water for incredible views of ships coming in and out of the harbor.  And be sure to take a peek in the tank for “Lucky,” the rare yellow lobster.

Dinner

  • McSeagulls: Gigantic menu (including several vegetarian and gluten free options), and really great service.
  • Boothbay Lobster Wharf: Beware the seagulls at this casual restaurant.  Though there is indoor seating, you won’t want to miss the view.  Grab a seat at one of the picnic tables on the dock.

Snacks and Sweets

I'm a get-get-get it popping.

  • Ice Cream Factory: This video pretty much sums it up.  Also, I ate so much ice cream this weekend, it’s a miracle I didn’t sink my pretzel float.
  • Coastal Maine Popcorn Company: We stopped into this cute storefront twice last week.  First round: 1 small bag of garlic parmesan, and 1 small bag of white cheddar.  And then we went back for round 2: dill pickle (amazing) and something chocolatey for Nick.  I was too busy inhaling my bag to take note of the actual flavor.  Check out the website for their popcorn of the month club, and a full list of varieties.

What to do

Maine in the rain.

The weather is incredible (even when it’s raining, which only happened once), the views are breathtaking, and your phone likely won’t get reception (which is both awesome and terrifying… hello, how do you call 911?).  Boothbay Harbor is the perfect place to do nothing.  Once you’re done doing nothing, I recommend renting kayaks.  And searching for pufflings.

If the sticker's facing you, you're holding the paddle correctly.

  • Cruise: There are a number of companies located right in the harbor that will take you on half- or full-day excursions.  From puffin tours (amazing!) and whale watching, to mackerel fishing and an adventure to Monhegan Island, there’s likely something for everyone.  Except the people that hate boats.  Obvi.
  • Rent a kayak or two: Nick’s parents rented two kayaks for us to play with for the week.  Someone from Tidal Transit dropped up the boats, did a safety demonstration (which I ignored) and gave us some tips on which coves to explore.  Nick and I went on a few explorations– it was really fun to “see Maine from sea level.”  Until I almost got capsized by a lobster boat.

What is this? A center for ants?!

  • Make a fairy house: Fairy houses are a coastal Maine tradition.  The house I built last year using an acorn cap, some moss and a few twigs, didn’t survive the winter but our next door neighbors made sure no fairies were left out in the cold.  They were on to something with those shells.

What a bad photo of something really good. Whoops.

  • Do a bit of shopping: Boothbay Harbor has lots of great little shops and galleries.  We browsed at a few antique shops, where I fell in love with a set of small pilgrim dishes and pair of clip-on “Ike” earrings from President Eisenhower’s campaign (don’t worry, I didn’t buy either).  I picked up a two of Dana Heacock‘s gorgeous prints of beach stones and a little surprise for my parents at Abacus Gallery.  We also picked up a toy for Clark at a really great place called The Creative Turtle and a few goodies from Sherman’s Books and Stationary.  Oh, actually… I got a few things there for you!
Because it wouldn’t be a vacation if I didn’t bring home a souvenir or three, I’d love to give* one of you a braided sailor’s bracelet, your very own “No Puffin'” sticker, and a sail-inspired journal.

Fun fact: We have painted concrete floors. And sadly, no puffins.

To enter, all you have to do is:
  • Leave a comment below
  • Not mind that I have a matching bracelet, journal and sticker and will probably claim that a. we planned it and b. we’re BFFLs
  • For an extra entry, feel free to tweet (please include this link: http://wp.me/pySBS-182 and @ElizabethEv, so that I catch it)

I will choose a random winner on Sunday.  *No need for disclaimer, I paid straight cash, homey.

Congratulations, Michelle!  Please send me an email (ontapfortoday@gmail[dot]com), and I will send your goodies out right away!

Also On Tap for Today:

Where do you go to getaway?  And what’s your favorite thing to do when you get there?