Tag Archives: Dance

Today: An interview with the Boston Ballet’s Erica Cornejo.

I recently had the opportunity to interview Erica Cornejo, a Principal Dancer with the Boston Ballet and a new mother to a wonderful baby boy.  I have long loved ballet, and as a mother-to-be, I was curious about how the roles of dancer and parent compliment one another.

 Boston Ballet Principal Dancer Erica Cornejo and her husband, Carlos Molina, performing in Balanchine’s Emeralds © The George Balanchine Trust. The Boston Ballet will be performing Jewels (which includes the ballet Emeralds) in May.  

Photo credit: Gene Schiavone

I am truly grateful to Erica for generously sharing her time and responses, and to the Boston Ballet for the opportunity to get to know one of their talented performers better.  I especially loved Erica’s comments about knowing at such a young age that she was born to dance.  That passion certainly shows through on stage.

When did you first start dancing?

EC: I was 4 years old when I started ballet.

When (or how) did you know you belonged in the Ballet?

EC: From the first day, I knew I wanted to do ballet. I was very little, but somehow I felt that passion for ballet inside of me at very early age.

Do you hope your child will pursue dance?  Why or why not?

EC: My husband, my brother, and I are dancers – for sure our child will be around ballet, music, and all kind of art because we love all that, but he will be what he desires to be. We love to do many things besides ballet and we would like to expose our child to try different things.

How has your routine changed since becoming a mother?  How has this affected your dancing?

EC: Well I guess the routine of everyone who is a parent changes. Now I have to adjust my schedule to my baby’s schedule, to be able to be with him as much as I can and do all the care for my baby. He is my number one priority and I will do my best to be a good mom.  As for the moment, I haven’t start dancing yet but what I feel already that my baby’s happiness brings more strength to me and just thinking about him makes my day more special.  I’m a lucky person, I have the most wonderful husband, the best family and now my miracle, my son who is my life.

What do you love most about ballet?

EC: What I love the most about ballet is that I’m able to transport myself and became a different character in each ballet I do. Being able to express my emotion through my dancing and make the audience experience what I feel is the best feeling.

If you had a full day to yourself, how would you spend it?

EC: With my loved ones always!

What is one misconception about ballet dancers you’d like to dispel?

EC: I say it all the time, dancers are humans, we have our good and bad moments like everyone else. Sometimes people tend  to think that we are like machines, that everything has to be perfect all the time.

Which performance are you most looking forward to this year? 

EC: Because I just had a baby, I was not able to be around to learn some of the new ballets. But I’m looking forward to whatever I will be cast in when I come back. I will try to be the best of myself.

Many thanks, again, to Erica and the Boston Ballet.  And my sincere congratulations to you and your family!

Would you like to read more?  Here’s my earlier interview with Boston Ballet dancer Emily Mistretta (added incentive: that post includes a photo of me waiting to go on stage as a two and a half year old ballerina-in-training).

Also On Tap for Today:

When you were little, what did you aspire to be? 

Today: An interview with Emily Mistretta of the Boston Ballet.

I’ve always enjoyed the idea of ballet.  I live for essie ballet slippers polish, ballet trends in fashion, and the movie Center Stage.  I have an extensive collection of legwarmers (perfect for going to and from yoga).  The last time I actually wore ballet slippers, though, I looked something like this.

That’s somewhat of a lie, but I refuse to post my middle school aged ballet photo.  Needless to say, my appreciation has been from a far, and my behind the scenes knowledge of what it takes to be a ballerina is limited, at best– so when I had the chance to interview Emily Mistretta, a member of the Boston Ballet’s Corps de Ballet, I leaped (somewhat gracefully) at the opportunity.  I am so grateful to Emily for taking the time to share her experience and insight.

[Photo courtesy of Emily and The Boston Ballet]

What does a typical day in the life of a Boston Ballet ballerina look like?  Does this change as you approach performances? 
EM: A typical day during rehearsal schedule starts with a class at 9:45 followed by a six hour rehearsal day until 6:30. The schedule varies depending on how many rehearsals you have, but it usually tends to be a pretty full day of dancing.   Our rehearsals demand all different kinds of ballet movement.  It is not atypical to transition back and forth from classical to modern or jazzy ballet rehearsals through the course of the day. For example, my day could start off with something classical, like Nutcracker, followed right by the the jazzy Rolling Stones piece “Rooster”. Then right back to another traditional ballet such as Sleeping Beauty. All before lunch.  As we get closer to performances, we start to focus more on the particular upcoming piece.  We change to a theater schedule about a week or two before showtime, which starts later in the day and goes later into the night. This way we get our minds and bodies ready for the performance schedule.
Is your fitness routine focused primarily in the studio, or do you cross train?  If so, what are some of you favorite ways to work out?
EM: Because what we do is so physically demanding, the majority of my fitness gained while working in the studio.  However, you don’t always get the cardio you need from working in rehearsals, so I like to cross train as well.  It’s always good to do your own abdominal work and keep a strong core by doing Pilates or Gyrotonics, but I also like getting in the pool.  Swimming is great and I also like to hold on to the edge of the pool and do a series of my barre exercises in the water.  It is incredibly difficult with the resistance of the water, but you also feel so great and supported.  I love a good yoga class as well, though I like to use it more as release then as an intense workout.  
What are some of your favorite foods for fueling your routine? 
EM: I recently discovered the joy of juicing,  it’s fantastic!  In the morning I like to make juices with fresh fruit and vegetables, like apples, beets, kale, carrots and ginger.  It’s a great way to get  my body all the great vitamins and nutrients that it so often craves.  I usually compliment the juice with something more substantial, such as an egg and a piece of toast. This usually keeps me from wilting by the time our 2:30pm lunch break rolls around.  Smoothies are a great snack to have during the day, when I need a quick boost during our short breaks that won’t bog me down. I like all different kinds and I always add some protein powder to keep up my energy.  
Do you consider dancers to be athletes (for the record– I certainly do!)?  Why or why not?
EM: I absolutely consider ballet dancers to be athletes!  I think it should be considered an Olympic sport!  But one of the most beautiful things about ballet is that while it is physically demanding as a sport, it is even more challenging as an art.  On top of the athleticism you have to be creative, beautiful, and painlessly graceful. It is wonderfully hard!
 
What do you love most about what you do?  What brought you to the Ballet?  Have you always wanted to dance?
EM: What I love most about ballet is that as a dancer and an audience member you have the rare opportunity to witness life through artistic expression.  There are moments you have on stage where your body is filled with adrenaline, energy is shooting through every part of you.  You are not dwelling on the past and you haven’t taken the next step into the future, you and your body are only consumed in the present.  Time slows and you are nothing but living in the bliss of the moment, experiencing each second as it comes to you..  I think you can give that to the audience so that they are along with you experiencing the present themselves and both sides are communally witnessing and enjoying life together.  I’m not quite sure I knew what that feeling was when I was a kid, I just knew that I felt it.  I liked the feeling of dancing and moving around as fast as I possibly could, which is probably why I usually tend to enjoy things that are a quick tempo!  As a child I knew I wanted to do whatever that was that made me feel so alive and if that meant dancing then I was going to dance!
Do you have any thoughts about the recent fitness trends involving “ballet-inspired” workouts? 
EM: Ballet technique creates phenomenal muscle structure.  When I look around at all my coworkers, guys and girls alike, it is so obvious!  Everyone is so beautifully toned and shaped!  Ballet technique, if done correctly (a never ending quest), has this way of creating incredibly strong muscles in a very linear and non bulky way.  I’ve personally never tried ballet tone classes, but I certainly would recommend any class that incorporates ballet technique.
 
What is your best tip for staying healthy and balanced during performance season?
EM: My best tip for staying healthy during performance season would be to listen to your body.  Give it the nutrients and proteins it craves, and stay routinely active. This will prevent fatigue and decrease risk of injury.  A dancer is generally most fatigued after a performance, so rest is extremely important. Stay on track with your health maintenance, including massages and physical therapy. Listening to and understanding your body will allow you to safely push it’s limits and increase it’s dancing potential! 
I am so looking forward to seeing Emily and her fellow dancers perform at the Boston Ballet’s Fall Programnext week.  In the meantime, I may need to dust off those ballet shoes…Also On Tap for Today:

Did you dance as a child?  Best/worst costume?

Today: Just dance.

[tweetmeme source=”elizabethev” only_single=false]Since my last post was completely disgusting, I felt I owed you something cute and fuzzy.  Like a picture I found of myself on Facebook, as a two or three year old, minutes before my first dance recital.

A similar photo was featured in our hometown newspaper in, like, 1985 or whatever.  I still have the clipping and those teeny, tiny ballet slippers.  While I think I looked pretty adorable as a mouse (we danced… and sang… to “Animal Crackers”), apparently I wasn’t especially skilled at memorizing choreography at such a tender age.  Rumor has it, I stood on stage like a deer in headlights… and then I picked my nose.  Ever the lady.

Needless to say, my dance career was short-lived.

Also On Tap for Today:

What’s your silliest childhood memory?

Today: Go it alone

Just danceAccording to a Meyers-Briggs personality assessment from late 2002, I am an introvert.  And while I’m no hermit, there are some things I like doing alone.  And then there are those things I would much prefer to do in the company of a partner-in-crime.  Attending a Bollywood dance-off would generally fall into the second category.

After trying in vain to recruit a friend or two, I showed up to Life in Synergy‘s Bay Back studios on Friday night completely alone (to be fair, I knew one of Nick’s co-workers would also be there, but since I’d never met her, I think I was still technically, completely alone).  This was my first visit (first class is free!), but I had the wherewithal to read their FAQ’s and remembered to bring a combo lock for the lockers.  What I forgot to remember was the combo-nation.

Anyway, the instructors divided everyone into two groups and taught the dance to Slumdog Millionaire‘s “Jai Ho.”  I probably looked like a reeeeal fool, but I had an absolute blast.  After everyone learned the moves, the two groups combined and we performed in smaller groups.  I laughed, I cried “Jai ho!” and I perspired like a man.  All by myself.

Also On Tap for Today:

  • Donate platelets (even though I planned to take a summer vacation from being voluntarily stabbed)
  • Pack up all my books, which are sorted by color
  • Diagnose myself with insanity

Have you ever ditched (or been ditched by) the group and gone it alone?  What are your tips for not looking like a social outcast?