Today: Happy Mother’s Day.

In celebration of Mother’s Day, here’s a photo of the last time it was socially acceptable for me to wear a crop top and hot shorts at the same time.  These days, it’s one or the other.  Just kidding… it’s very much neither.

Happy Mother’s Day, Mom.  I love you.  And I owe you the world.

Also On Tap for Today:

What’s the best advice your mom, or an important lady in your life, has given you?

Today: 100 days of Grace.

It’s been exactly 100 days since Grace was born.

There are moments when it feels like she has just arrived, and others when I can’t believe she hasn’t been with us all along.  Maybe it’s the sleep deprivation, but there are times when I cannot imagine life before that instant when she was placed on my chest in the delivery room and everything changed.

Left: Grace is 6 hours old. Right: Grace is 100 days and 6 hours old. Both: I am overjoyed, overtired, and in need of a hairbrush.

We started going to a new moms’ group when Grace was almost three weeks old.  I am so grateful for that community.  And I want all eight of our babies to grow up and be college roommates.  Or live on an organic farm together.  Or something.

At our last formal meeting, the group’s facilitator asked us to share something that is going well, something that is challenging, and something that has changed.  What stood out to me was the confidence I had gained over those first weeks.  And how much we’ve grown and developed and changed together.  And how I love her more than I could ever adequately express.

In honor of Grace’s first 100 days, 50 thoughts and reflections on life with our beautiful baby… I would have given you 100, but let’s be serious:

  1. I think the first thing I noticed about Grace was her nose.  It is so tiny and sweet, I kiss it all the time.
  2. I’ve found so much love and support in both expected and unexpected places.
  3. More so than ever, I need other people.  I need help.  I need support.  I need to be told that my crazy hair and (unintentionally) tight pants look good.
  4. It’s all very humbling, especially for someone who has always preferred to just do it myself.
  5. I am more grateful than ever for Nick, for our families and friends, and everyone who has been so kind and gentle and supportive to us.
  6. Having a community of new moms, sharing similar experiences, has been invaluable.  (If you live in the Boston area and are expecting or have children, I highly recommend Mama and Me in JP.)
  7. We were discharged from the hospital on a Friday evening, but had to see our pediatrician early the next morning (I love that they’re open on weekends) for a weight check and some testing.  The only thing more overwhelming than being sent home with a very new, very small, very needy baby… is packing her up and taking her back out in the world less than a day later.
  8.  … but because we needed to, we figured it out.  There wasn’t much time for panic or worry, and eventually necessity lead to competence (sort of… once I had the child locks on, got in the back seat to move Grace from her car seat to the Ergo… and then got trapped inside my own car).
  9. After I made a few solo trips to the doctor without, like, losing our child, Grace and I started going to more fun places, too.
  10. I made it my goal to get out of the condo at least once a day while on maternity leave.
  11. We spent Thursdays at my parents’ house, walked to Castle Island when it was warm enough, spent a shameful amount of both time and money in the stationary aisle at Target, and even got our first library card.  Start ‘em young.
  12. I am so grateful to have good health care.
  13. Same goes for a wonderful pediatrician and group practice.  They have been so helpful and supportive.  And they don’t make me feel like a nutty first time parent.  Even though I am a nutty first time parent.
  14. Breastfeeding is hard.  Pumping at work isn’t exactly a walk in the park, either.  But, for me, it’s worth it.
  15. I say, “Let’s take this one day at a time” to myself a lot lately.
  16. I am convinced the face babies make after they eat is the secret to world peace.
  17. I can’t remember the last time I’ve slept for more than 2-3 hours at once.  I do remember the first time I slept long enough to have a dream after Grace was born though.  I dreamt that President Obama was making a very important speech about Olympic figure skating.
  18. I don’t know why I thought this, but I was certain both Grace and I would be sleeping through the night before I returned to work.  She wakes to be fed 2-3 times each night, meanwhile I have friends whose babies were sleeping through the night after a couple of weeks.  It’s all very mysterious.
  19. I ‘m embracing our middle-of-the-night wakings as our time.
  20. Grace’s smile can stop me in my tracks.  Even (or especially) at 3 AM.
  21. It’s the best gift.
  22. When I was pregnant, it was obvious (except at the beginning, when it was a little more like… maybe she’s pregnant, maybe she ate six pizzas).  Especially towards the end, even complete strangers were nicer to me.  People wanted to know when I was due, if I was having a girl or boy, how I was feeling.  I appreciate that more now than I did a the time.
  23. I attract similarly well-intentioned attention when I am out with Grace, but when I’m by myself, I sort of feel a bit adrift.  Like that I want to tell the mailman I have a baby, or I nearly tell the lady in line ahead of me that I am a mom, too.
  24. I guess I hadn’t given much thought to what navigating a new identity would be like, and in that way, I sort of miss being pregnant.  Sort of.
  25. I like that we are creating new rituals and traditions with our sweet girl and our family.
  26. Children’s books either totally awesome, or totally weird.  I’ve yet to find anything in between.
  27. Aaaaand I have yet to make it through Wherever You Are: My Love Will Find You without crying.
  28. It feels like I’m softer (and I’m not just talking about my mid-section) than before.
  29. And at the same time, becoming a mother has definitely made me tougher.  I feel a stronger instinct to protect and defend.  I guess that’s what happens when you’ve got more to lose.
  30. I sing to Grace all the time, but the only songs I seem to actually know the words to are Christmas songs.
  31. Clark has been so good.  We’re really lucky.
  32. He has started trying to play with Grace, bringing toys and dropping them beside her, or gently nudging her when she’s on her activity mat.
  33. There is no sense in getting dressed until Grace is safely strapped into her car seat and we’re just about to head out the door.  Any sooner is just asking to be, welp, puked on.
  34. I do not miss my maternity clothes.
  35. I consigned them all the first chance I had.
  36. Uh… except for my maternity jeans.  I am saving those for Thanksgiving (or any other day when eating my body weight in potatoes seems like a real possibility).
  37. I wish I had Grace’s wardrobe.  Cotton everything.  Stretchy pants.  Cuffins and built-in socks.  Kimono tops.  Please.
  38. The underwear you get at the hospital is, like, the best underwear ever.
  39. My favorite thing to wear, though: my baby.  Babywearing is the best.
  40. Same goes for skin-to-skin contact.
  41. I could stare at Grace all day long.
  42. Being away from her during the day has been challenging (but not nearly as challenging as I imagined), and I find myself wanting to hold her all night, even if it means I risk waking her up.
  43. I am thankful that I have both a family and a career.
  44. But I struggle a bit, wondering if I am doing enough as a wife, a mother and a worker.
  45. I’ve always been in awe of my parents, but even more so now that I am one.
  46. Nick is an incredible father.  It’s like he’s known what to do right from the start.
  47. Labor and delivery was amazing.  I’ve heard people compare the experience to all sorts of things (marathons and WODs and whitewater rafting, for example) and I can firmly say this: nothing compares.
  48. It was painful and long and, at times, a bit scary (and I am pretty sure I had it relatively easy after hearing others’ birth stories), but all of that fell away the second Grace was born.
  49. Some day I’ll tell you what it was like to ride an elevator with a bunch of dudes in suits on their way to work while my water was breaking.  Maybe.
  50. After three months, I love that we’re starting to see and know Grace’s personality.  She’s curious and busy, and definitely a morning person.

I wouldn’t trade a minute of any of these past 100 days for anything in the world.

Life with Grace just keeps getting better.

Also On Tap for Today:

What are you celebrating today?

Today: Be a pansy.

If you had a foul mouthed P.E. teacher, perhaps you’ve been advised to “stop being such a pansy” during dodgeball games.  If you had my P.E. teacher, you learned that you can wear high heels with tear-away pants.  So there’s that.

pansy

Anyway, if you’ve ever been called a pansy before, I’ve got two messages for you:

  1. I love you.  You are perfect.  Never change.
  2. Pansies are actually pretty amazing.

In fact, pansies are one of the few plants that can survive outdoors in early spring.  Their vibrantly hued flowers sort of look like little faces, and that makes people (specifically, me) smile.  There’s no shame in being a pansy.  I’ve touched on this (and the time a man called me a pit bull) before, but words are important – both how they’re said or delivered, and how they’re felt or received.

I very well may get my tires slashed for sharing this, but someone has taken to leaving handwritten notes on the windshields of cars parked in our neighborhood.  Because I always dreamed of being a detective, naturally I’ve all but citizen’s arrested the person who I am certain is writing these notes.

I get that parking can be a challenge, especially in Southie, but I can’t imagine having the time and energy to notice that someone took up two spots, then go into our condo, find a notepad and a pen, think up the most insane swear words to include, write these words down, go back outside, stick the note under the offending car’s wiper blades, go back inside, and then try and feel good about myself and what I’ve just done.

(Heck, if I had even a fraction of that time and energy, I’d take a nap.  Or, you know, spend it with my family.  Possibly, like… napping.)

This is what strikes me:  It takes the same (maybe more?) energy to be mean and make a point, as it does to be civil and make that same point.  And had it been my car (I noticed it on someone else’s car and grabbed it because I felt the need to guard the driver’s spirit… and also because I thought the words were so shocking, I couldn’t stop laughing and had to show Nick), I think I would have focused more on the anger imparted, and less on my faulty parking job.   Who knows what kind of day either person was having, but I can’t imagine a note like that would do much good for either its author or the intended recipient.

It’s totally okay to be a pansy (in fact, I encourage it), and it’s okay to be annoyed when your neighbor parks like a boob.  But it’s not okay to be mean.

Also On Tap for Today:

What’s your favorite swear? How’s your Monday going?

 

 

Today: My grocery staples and a Dairy Pure giveaway.

My diet has changed a lot in the past year.  When I was pregnant, I ate around the clock to keep morning sickness at bay.  I was able to tolerate gluten again, mostly (there was a week in August when all I wanted was bread… so all I ate was bread).  I tried to form a fan club for Whole Foods mashed potatoes.  I gave up caffeine and tried to cut back on anything especially spicy or acidic (holy heartburn).

Now that Grace is three months old, I am eating more like, well, myself.  One changed that has stuck, however: I am drinking milk again.  Not almond milk, not cashew milk, not goat’s milk… straight up cow’s milk.

When we were kids, we drank milk with dinner every night and lived close enough to a dairy farm to have it delivered by the cold, glass bottleful.  (Believe it or not, I grew up in Greater Boston in the 80′s, not in a Little House on the Prairie.)  At some point, though, once I was out on my own, I stopped drinking milk altogether.  When I started seeing a registered dietitian and embarked on one elimination diet after another, dairy was often the first to go.  And then I would miss cheese (real talk).  I skipped the milk, however, until I was pregnant.  It was one of the few cravings I had during those nine months.  It’s been a personal choice (and one I researched and discussed with my midwife), but adding several servings of milk to my diet has been a healthy way to help meet my calcium, protein and vitamin needs.

In addition to milk, here are few of my other weekly grocery staples:

  • Salad mix (usually baby greens with herbs)
  • Fresh vegetables for salads and snacks (bell peppers, cucumbers, carrots, onions, sugar snap peas and radishes)
  • Tomatoes, bananas, apples, and berries
  • The magical fruit Beans, nut butter, hummus
  • Couscous, quinoa, rice
  • Guacamole (which, in my opinion, should be its own food group) – I usually buy single serve portions – a bit more expensive, but less goes to waste for us
  • Cheese (duh)
  • Fresh herbs
  • Cut flowers (always)

With so much non-food being added to our actual food these days, I think it requires a bit of extra effort to shop these days.  I started drinking Dairy Pure milk this winter, so when the company reached out a few weeks ago with information about their new Worry-Free Flip Caps, I was happy to share their info with you.

All Dairy Pure milk passes a 5-point Purity Checklist, ensuring the following:

  1. Dairy Pure farmers pledge to use no artificial growth hormones
  2. All milk is tested for antibiotics
  3. Milk is continuously quality tested to ensure purity
  4. Milk comes only from cows fed a nutritious diet
  5. Milk is cold-shipped fresh from a trusted dairy within hours

The new caps, which stay on the bottle and keep milk fresher, give me even more peace of mind when shopping the dairy aisle.  To find Dairy Pure milk at a market near you, click here.

Dairy Pure is giving away 5 of their insulated shopping totes for your next trip to the market.  To enter, simply leave a comment below.  I will select 5 random winners on Saturday, May 10.

Disclosure: I received a gift card to cover the cost of purchasing Dairy Pure milk at my local market.  I was not compensated for this post, nor for my comments about the product.  I only review products and services that I feel good about (obvi… I hope).

Also On Tap for Today:

What’s your take on dairy?  Care to share your usual shopping list?

 

Today: Streamlining my mornings.

I have partnered with belVita and Dannon to help promote the belVita and Dannon partnership.  I have been compensated for my time commitment to the program, which includes writing about the promotion and product.  However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.

For the past (nearly) three months, my routine has been… welp… a total lack of routine.  It seems like the second I started to get comfortable, and Grace and I had fallen into a pattern of sorts, things changed.  She started eating more.  Or less.  She started sleeping more.  Or less.  Morning was the best time for us to get out for a walk or do a few errands.  And then afternoon became a better time for that.  Some days I’d be showered, dressed and out on the town (or more accurately, cruising around Southie with Grace in her stroller or baby carrier) by 8:30 AM.  Other days, I’d be in pajamas until 8:30… PM.

The sole constant:  We’ve been figuring it all out together.  Me, Nick, and Grace (and Clark, but let’s be serious… he’s a go with the flow little guy).  Becoming a parent has been challenging, exhausting, and at times, overwhelming.  It’s also been the single most amazing experience, and I know I am better for it.  The time we’ve had together these past few months, and all of those transitions from one non-routine to the next, have been so special, so sacred.

Tomorrow we make our next big transition, as I head back to work and Grace begins daycare.  In a perfect world, we could do it all and have it all.  We’d be together all day long, be attentive parents, and be productive while enjoying our fulfilling careers.  We’d achieve the perfect balance.  But the world isn’t perfect. (Duh, lady.)  I know I am lucky to have both a beautiful family and a career that challenges and excites me.  As anxious as I am about the changes to come, I know we made these choices for all the right reasons.  We are so lucky to have options.

Um… this post was supposed to be about breakfast.  Not feelings. (I’m sure I will have much more to say about being a workin’ mom once I have more than 15 seconds of experience as one.)

Back on task.  Breakfast.  Mornings.

While there are plenty of new challenges we’ll need to navigate in the coming days, weeks, and months, I am hoping that making a plan for how we start each day, and making an effort to streamline our mornings, will help.  I’ve never been much of a breakfast eater, much to the chagrin of my parents, my husband, people that I flip off in traffic, my primary care physician… you get the point.  Despite having good intentions, sitting down for a healthy meal at the start of the day always seemed to fall by the wayside when faced with a time crunch.  I can skip breakfast, but I can’t (in good conscience) skip walking the dog.  Or, like, bathing.  Having someone else depending on me in such a real way has been the ultimate game changer.  More than ever it’s clear: I need to take care of myself in order take care of other people.

BelVita and Dannon have partnered to get me (and my fellow Americans) to ditch the excuses and make time for a quick breakfast that boasts 12 grams of protein and nutritious, steady energy (…maybe we can have it all.  Just kidding.  Too soon.  Pass the Kleenex.).  I’ve been pairing Dannon Oikos 0% vanilla Greek yogurt with apple cinnamon Crunchy belVita Breakfast Biscuits, along with an apple, in the mornings.  The combination is delicious and convenient and is sure to become part of my workday routine (bonus: if when I forget a spoon for my yogurt, a biscuit is the perfect stand in).

Are you looking to streamline your mornings?  Laura Stack, “The Productivity Pro”, offers the following tips for getting the most of your morning:

  • Do as much as you can the night before.  Leave as little preparation as possible until the last minute — you’ll thank yourself in the morning.
  • Spend 20 minutes at the end of each day planning your to-do list.  When you download the next day’s activities beforehand, you can devote your morning to enjoyment rather than stress.
  • Be sure to start your morning with a delicious, balanced breakfast.  Together, the nutritious steady energy of belVita and 12 grams of protein in Dannon Oikos Green nonfat yogurt along with a piece of fruit will help you get more out of your morning.

Welp, my breakfast is set for tomorrow… our bags are packed… I guess we’re ready?

Also On Tap for Today:

How do you streamline your morning?  Favorite breakfast ideas for busy folks excuse makers?

Today: Lettuce celebrate!

This post brought to you by Organic Choice. All opinions are 100% mine.

I’ve loved having the chance to work with Organic Choice products this spring in an effort to grow (some of) my own food.  It’s ideal for edible gardening and is an easy choice when you’re trying to live a bit more gently and greenly (quoth the lady with the SUV and a secret stash of Elnett).  While my plants aren’t quite gazpacho-ready, the lettuce greens have started sprouting, as have my basil and cilantro seeds.  I’m taking the lazy more reliable route when it comes to tomatoes, and starting with an actual plant, rather than attempt to grow those guys from seed.

It’s still a bit too cool in Boston to keep our plants on the deck, so we’ve been keeping the pots in our kitchen, where I’ve been obsessively checking for growth every chance I get.  I am desperate to keep these little guys alive and well.  So that I can, welp… proudly eat them.

I wanted to spruce up our pots a bit (and keep track of what the heck I had planted), so I broke out my Sharpie oil paint pen and tried to remember how to write in cursive.

The result:  A simple (and dare I say cute?) way to upgrade these $2 pots from the local home and garden store.

You can tell just how much these little lettuce sprouts are craving the sun (I feel you, little guys), growing towards our windows.  I’ve been rotating the pots each morning and afternoon to ensure each plant is getting equal exposure, something we won’t have to worry about once it’s warm enough to bring them outside.

In addition to the caprese salads and heaping bowls of gazpacho I’ve planning for, I’m excited to whip up a few recipes (namely herby pasta with lettuce…) from this book, which has been hiding on our bookshelves for ages.  If you’re looking to learn more about container garden, urban gardening, and growing your own food, I recommend a visit to the Miracle-Gro Learn And Grow library.

While I’m still a few weeks away from being able to harvest anything, I’m really looking forward to being able to share a meal — one that includes food I’ve actually grown – with our family.

In the meantime, you can find me admiring those little lettuce sprouts.

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Also On Tap for Today:

Are you growing any food this spring?  How would you put Miracle-Gro Organic Choice to good use?

 

Today: Floral Arranging 101 (Week 2)

Our assigned project for the second week of Nicole’s Classes Floral Arranging 101 was a “wild English garden” arrangement.  I fell a bit short when it came to sourcing flowers and greens (hello… bamboo?), but I tried to follow directions as best I could to create an arrangement with an effortless, not so structured look.

During week 2, I learned about “S” composition in flower arranging, how to make a floral frog out of twigs, and the value of having neighbors who will let you forage in their gardens (I, um… live next door to a bar).

While I’m fairly certain I did not ace the assignment, I am happy with the finished product.  I especially love the bright blue campanula and how it spills over the vase.

For week 3 (you can find my week 1 project here), we made floral head wreaths, perfect for Grace’s first Coachella Easter.  More on that soon.

Also On Tap for Today:

What have you been working on lately?

Today: Love is stronger.

Hurt can be strong.  Fear can be strong.  Violence can be strong.  But love is stronger.

It’s always stronger.

P.S. If you have a minute (and I hope you do!), please watch this incredibly moving speech from a family friend, fellow BC alum, bombing survivor, and all around good guy.

Also On Tap for Today:

Do you have something hopeful, inspiring, or lovely to share?

Today: Fear is not productive.

For the record, this post is supposed to be suitable for all  humans.  It isn’t supposed to be about being a mom.  Or boobs.  Or CPR.  It just starts that way, so like… bear with me.

 We took a bunch of classes in an effort to prepare for Grace’s arrival.  Infant CPR felt both helpful and necessary.  Breastfeeding Basics was, well, basically useless.  None of it made sense until I actually started breastfeeding, and at that point, I had the invaluable support of lactation consultants in the hospital.  They helped me figure that cool stuff out.  During the class itself, we watched some weird slide shows (I have never seen so many boobs in my life, nor do I expect to, ever ever again), and a movie with credits that included a thank you “to the women of Bulgaria.”  I am still not sure what to make of that.  Our instructor for Child Safety went a bit rogue, so the class was more about how weird babies can look when their born, and less about… safety.

Fortunately, the gaps left by the safety class were more than filled in when I had an appointment with a Boston Police officer to have our car seat inspected, just two days before Grace made her early arrival.  What I thought would be a two minute check of our car seat (which Nick had expertly installed) turned into 90 minutes of me learning how to actually use our car seat (little did I know how soon I be putting this new found knowledge to work), how many air bags my car has, which items in the trunk could turn into projectiles if (God forbid) I got into an accident, how to safely flee an emergency by car with an infant in tow, how to use a car seat without a base if I were to flee an emergency by taxi, and the importance of actually reading safety manuals.

Our childbirth class was cut short by a blizzard, so while we learned a bit about labor, we never learned about delivery.  Needless to say, when it came time to deliver Grace… Nick and I both had a lot of questions.  And I am certain our attending midwife and nurses had several questions about us.

Anyway, in an ongoing effort to get my life together before going back to work in just a short time (don’t get me started, I am almost out of Kleenexes), I was sorting through various info packets from the aforementioned classes, and I came across a page of notes I had taken.  In all caps, I had written,

Fear is not productive.

I remember one of the instructors mentioning that fear (and anxiety and worry) can slow down labor.  I am pretty sure I wrote this sentence down so that I could remember it if I went into labor and we were stuck in traffic.  Or in an elevator.  Like, I would look at pictures of clowns (or something equally terrifying) and the fear would persuade our baby to wait until we were safely at the hospital.

I think, at the time, I missed the point.  The instructor meant that being informed, making preparations, and feeling a sense of control would have the opposite effect.  Fear is not productive.  Being empowered is.  With seemingly so much more to worry about, to be anxious about, and to feel doubtful about these days, I needed this reminder.

Sure, in certain cases, fear probably is quite productive.  Say, if I were a cavewoman and a lion came into my cave to eat my cheese doodles, and I saw the lion, and I felt afraid… and that fear caused me to take my doodles (you can’t leave them behind, I imagine they were really hard to come by in those days) and run?  Productive.  Or that time I went skydiving with my ex-boyfriend in college (that should totally be the name of a Lifetime move: Skydiving with My Ex…. and  maybe on the way to the airfield, before she actually skydives, the main character would find out that she had been switched at birth, just to keep things realistic interesting.  Feel free to steal and pitch this idea to the network.), and I felt fear overwhelm me as I prepared to jump.  That’s productive.  People really shouldn’t jump out of planes for no reason.  Fortunately, I survived, but I did lose a contact lens during free fall.

Real, physical fear — the kind that has helped us stay alive as a species for so long — aside, the kind of fear that has us trying to predict the future, or read others’ minds, or play out all possible scenarios, is not productive.  Worrying about whether or not Grace will be happy at day care is not going to make her any more or less happy.  Getting anxious about making time to fit everything into the day is not going to fold the laundry, preside over meetings, pick out a semi-normal outfit for me to wear, and finish a workout.  That kind of fear is just not productive.  It wastes time.  It wastes energy.  And it leads to more fear.

As much as I love cop shows (which is to say, a lot), I’ve always been squeamish when it comes to the violent parts.  I like the intrigue, the plotting, and the cool police lingo, but I’ve always tended to cover my eyes during any of the real action.  I got into the habit, jokingly, of covering Clark’s eyes, too and telling him to “guard his spirit.”  This has always made Nick laugh, but I’ve caught myself saying this hippy b.s. more and more… and sort of seriously.  And most often to, well, myself.

When that unproductive fear creeps in, we’ve got to guard our spirits.  And with that, I am off to legally change my name to Soleil Moon Frye Dreamcatcher Incense Flower.

Also On Tap for Today:

Do you have any unusual fears?  What was the caveperson version of cheese doodles?

Today: Floral Arranging 101 (Week 1)

I recently came across Nicole’s Classes, a selection of online video classes on topics like photography and design, while headed down a spiral of late night Internet consumption, when I should have been trying to get back to sleep.  Which reminds me, the next person who encourages me to “sleep when the baby sleeps,” … well, you don’t want to be that person.  Just kidding.  Kind of.

Back on topic: I’ve always been enchanted by flowers.  I worked for a florist when I was younger and loved watching the designers carefully choose their flowers and artfully arrange them.  When I saw that a Floral Arranging 101 class was about to begin (and would wrap up just before I head back to work… cue all of the nervous, excited, conflicted and overwhelmed feelings), I bit the $125 bullet and signed up.

The class, taught by Chelsea Fuss, spans four weeks and features one project per week.  Each project is supported by video tutorials, recommended materials and flowers, and access to the instructor for feedback.  This week’s project was a hand-tied bouquet, along with an aqua pack for transporting the bouquet.

I’m having so much fun with the class, and figured I’d share my weekly progress here.  We like looking at pretty things, right?

After a few failed flower shopping trips, I found this selection at my favorite Whole Foods in Cambridge.  I would have loved a bit more greenery, but I’m happy with how it turned out.  And those tulips that could possibly pass for peonies or cabbage roses?  I am obsessed.

I really get so much satisfaction from seeing a project through to completion (I can’t tell you how many things I’ve started only to get distracted and stray… okay, I can: a lot.), having a chance to engage the creative part of my brain, and work with my hands (on something other than the ancient art of diapering) a bit.

Also On Tap for Today:

Got a favorite flower?